An Atlas of Pressure Dissolution Features

© Copyright 2002 by

L. Bruce Railsback

Department of Geology, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602-2501 U.S.A.

 

Table of Contents

  Preface to the Atlas  
     
  Introduction to Pressure Dissolution and Stylolites  
     
  Section 1: Microscopic Views of Pressure-dissolved Intergranular Contacts  
  Sutured intergranular contacts in a calcite-cemented oolitic grainstone.   Figure 1-1  
  Sutured contacts between echinoderm and brachiopod fragements in a sandy limestone.   Figure 1-2  
  Sutured contacts between echinoderm fragments in a bioclastic grainstone.   Figure 1-3  
  Sutured contact between quartz grains in a quartzose sandstone.   Figure 1-4  
  Sutured contacts between quartz grains in a coarse sandstone.   Figure 1-5  
  Fitted fabric in a bioclastic grainstone.   Figure 1-6  
  Sutured intergranuiar contacts in a calcite-cemented bioclastic grainstone.   Figure 1-7  
         
  Section 2: Microscopic Views of Stylolites and Dissolution Seams: Typical Examples  
  Quartz silt in a small stylolite.   Figure 2-1  
  Partly pressure-dissolved quartz sand grains at three small stylolites.   Figure 2-2  
  Quartz sand grains at a stylolite.   Figure 2-3  
  A long brachiopod grain partly destroyed at a dissolution seam.   Figure 2-4  
  Column of a vertical stylolite in an oolitic grainstone.   Figure 2-5  
  Small stylolite in an intensely compacted grainstone.   Figure 2-6  
  Well-defined stylolite in an intensely compacted grainstone.   Figure 2-7  
  Long view of a horizontal stylolite in a micstone to packstone.   Figure 2-8  
  Dolomite-rich residuum in a stylolite in a grainstone.   Figure 2-9  
  Horizontal stylolite in an echinoderm-oolitic grainstone.   Figure 2-10  
  Long column of a horizontal stylolite.   Figure 2-11  
         
  Section 3: Microscopic Views of Stylolites and Dissolution Seams: Special Relationships  
  Strain in quartz lattice at a pressure-dissolved contact along a stylolite.   Figure 3-1  
  Fractures cross-cut by and cross-cutting a stylolite.   Figure 3-2  
  Small stylolites associated with silicification.   Figure 3-3  
  Stylolite column with a serrate side and calcite-filled side.   Figure 3-4  
  Stylolite column with a serrate side and calcite-filled side.   Figure 3-5  
  Cross-cutting relationships between a bioclast, a dissolution seam, and two stylolites.   Figure 3-6  
  Dissolution seams at the margins of a burrow.   Figure 3-7  
  Small stylolites merging into one prominent stylolite, with residual dolomite.   Figure 3-8  
         
  Section 4: Hand-sample Views of Stylolites and Dissolution Seams: Typical Examples  
  A horizontal stylolite.   Figure 4-1  
  A large horizontal stylolite.   Figure 4-2  
  A vertical stylolite.   Figure 4-3  
  One horizontal stylolite and numerous dissolution seams.   Figure 4-4  
         
  Section 5: Hand-sample Views of Stylolites and Dissolution Seams: Special Relationships  
  A horizontal stylolite cross-cut by a vertical stylolite.   Figure 5-1  
  A horizontal stylolite cross-cut by a vertical stylolite.   Figure 5-2  
  A vertical stylolite cross-cut by three horizontal dissolution seams.   Figure 5-3  
  A horizontal stylolite with sutured sides of columns.   Figure 5-4  
  A horizontal stylolite with a broken column.   Figure 5-5  
  Horizontal stylolites cutting and cut by a fracture.   Figure 5-6  
  Two nearly perpendicular sets of stylolites with nonetheless parallel teeth.   Figure 5-7  
  Two sets of stylolites cross-cut by a later stylolite.   Figure 5-8  
  Cross-cutting vertical and horizontal stylolites and stylolite modification.   Figure 5-9  
  Highly inclined stylolite with nearly vertical teeth.   Figure 5-10  
         
  Bibliography Part I (A-L)  
  Bibliography Part II (M-Z)  
     
 


 

This document was generated by Bruce Railsback of the Department of Geology of the University of Georgia. Links to it for purposes of education and research are welcomed. Reproduction of material herein in print publications or in on-line documents is allowed only with express written permission of the author.